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The Language of Diversity - Shared screen with speaker view
Chez Chesak
28:49
Wow, impressive panel indeed! Welcome all.
Megan Padilla
28:51
Wow, what a panel!
Ellen Albanese
29:11
Absolutely!
David Kaufman
35:59
https://www.pewresearch.org/hispanic/2020/08/11/about-one-in-four-u-s-hispanics-have-heard-of-latinx-but-just-3-use-it/
David Kaufman
36:01
Here it is
Ann Laschever
36:10
Thanks David
David Swanson
36:13
thanks
David Kaufman
36:14
:-)
David Swanson
37:43
What is the objection to "hispanic”?
Megan Padilla
37:51
How to bridge the gap between “most readers” preferences — leaning to the long-time used terms such as Hispanic — vs. the college age readers who lean to Latinx?
JORGE ARAUZ
38:05
Do Latinx people identify with the word “Hispanic”?
JORGE ARAUZ
38:33
who prefers “Hispanic”?
Harrison Liu
39:26
YES MARTY!!!
Chez Chesak
39:36
Great point
David Swanson
40:05
In Southern CA there is an assumption that all Latino people are Mexican. So I prefer to use Hispanic when I am not sure.
Mary Jo Manzanares
40:14
Interesting info about Hispanic/Latinx - That parallels the preference of my extended family - the baby boomer generation (including my husband) prefers Hispanic. The kids (millennials and GenZ prefer Latinx) when identifying themselves.
Chez Chesak
40:28
Bame or BAME may refer to: Black, Asian and minority ethnic, a UK demographic
Chez Chesak
40:56
(From Wikipedia BTW)
LEBAWIT GIRMA
41:17
Exactly Marty. I also agree with the elitist issue that David Kaufman mentioned. As we know there’s a lot of elitism even within Latino or Latinx :) communities.
JORGE ARAUZ
41:29
on the census Hispanic isn’t even an option. you either have to check black or white, which many Latinx people don’t identify with either
Chez Chesak
42:13
I love that Marty has been kicked out of, apparently, many plantations. Way to speak out!
Shelly Rivoli
44:13
So what is a better way to write "confederate soldier," for example?
LEBAWIT GIRMA
44:43
I actually believe we should all stop saying “slaves.” They were enslaved Africans.
Jill Robinson
45:43
Agreed, Lily.
Kim Harms Robinson
46:08
Tonya can you please speak up or turn up your volume? I'm having a hard time hearing you compared to other panelists :)
Martinique Lewis
46:43
@lily YES
sarah greaves-gabbadon
46:52
I think the issue, particularly in the Caribbean travel industry, is the romanticization of plantations and the colonial era. Slavery happened yes, and should be acknowledged. But let’s not celebrate and sugar-coated in this way.
Amanda Williams
47:11
I’m glad you said that, Lily! I’ve been trying to do a better job of writing “enslaved people” or “enslaved humans” instead of “slaves,” as I think it’s important to be clear that these were PEOPLE.
David Kaufman
47:17
It would bother me as well
Ann Laschever
47:28
Agree Sarah.
Martinique Lewis
47:40
@Sarah YES
sarah greaves-gabbadon
47:46
@Lily: A big fat YES to using “enslaved” over “slaves.”
Ellen Albanese
48:14
"Confined" to a wheelchair is verboten at the Boston Globe, the thinking being that a wheelchair conveys freedom to move, not confinement.
JORGE ARAUZ
48:20
Brilliant @Lily
Brian Major
48:27
ANY references to Confederate symbols or history MUST be put into context in all instances. Plantations are also important historic artifacts, just like concentration camps, to reflect the truth of what occurred so it is not repeated. I agree with David: it is important that we acknowledge planations existed as long as we describe exactly what they were.
LEBAWIT GIRMA
48:28
@Amanda - so important. As an African born and raised, it drives me up the wall every time I hear it. Africans were forced into slavery, it’s an important distinction.
LEBAWIT GIRMA
48:50
@Sarah Exactly re: former Caribbean plantations!
Ann Laschever
48:58
@Brian agree!
Megan Padilla
48:59
A takeaway I’m hearing is that despite trying to “get it right,” the writer must listen to and respect the person(s) they are writing about.
Ellen Albanese
51:43
Here on Cape Cod, we have a significant Wampanoag population. They prefer Wampanoag Native People to "tribe.," which I know because I asked.
Harrison Liu
51:49
Thank you Ryan. I’ve always wanted to know but was afraid to ask
Martinique Lewis
51:50
@Ryan thank you, I had no clue
David Swanson
51:52
I thought we had moved away from American Indian, now Native American
Chez Chesak
52:09
I believe so David. I sure have.
David Swanson
52:55
Or Indigenous
Paula Froke
54:28
https://www.apstylebook.com/race-related-coverage
connie nelson
54:31
Which is most appropriate/preferred -- African American history or Black history? or other?
Chez Chesak
55:53
Thanks Paula!
Paula Froke
55:57
NAJA says both American Indian and Native American are OK as terms.
LEBAWIT GIRMA
56:02
Thanks for bringing that up, Hugo.
JORGE ARAUZ
56:05
Brazilians are Latinx but not Hispanics. Spaniards refer to themselves as White Europeans. Do Hispanics have to speak Spanish?
David Swanson
56:11
Thanks Paula
Paula Froke
56:26
they also note: check a person's preference.
LEBAWIT GIRMA
57:17
@Jorge I thought that’s what the distinction was with Hispanic - that they are Spanish speaking but not from Spain
Paula Froke
58:53
from our upcoming entry (off the record) …. Apply the word looters carefully and specifically to those who engage in looting, do not overuse, and avoid the labeling and the stigmatizing of larger communities, groups or all protesters. The word looters applied to large groups has carried racial overtones in the past.
David Swanson
58:57
On this journey I continue to learn. Recently when I was writing I described the conical hat, common in Vietnam and other Asian countries, as a coolie hat. I wondered where the colorful word came from and discovered it’s a pejorative, to describe a laborer. Scratched it off my list.
JORGE ARAUZ
59:34
@Lebawit if a “Hispanic” does not speak Spanish are they then considered “Latinx”?
Megan Padilla
59:39
Kasey Kaler: Can you share some best practices for referencing travelers with disabilities?
Chez Chesak
01:01:01
David, I always wondered what those hats were called. According to Wikipedia: nón lá ("leaf hat")
Megan Padilla
01:01:06
Thank you David Kaufman for that comment.
LEBAWIT GIRMA
01:01:07
@Jorge - Hmmm am thinking. :)
LEBAWIT GIRMA
01:01:24
I would say yes, Jorge
JORGE ARAUZ
01:01:59
thanks @Lebawit!
Paula Froke
01:03:22
Our guidance: LGBT, LGBTQ (adj.) Acceptable in all references for lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender, or lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and questioning and/or queer. In quotations and the formal names of organizations and events, other forms such as LGBTQIA and other variations are also acceptable with the other letters explained. I generally stands for intersex, and A can stand for asexual (a person who doesn't experience sexual attraction), ally (some activists decry this use of the abbreviation for a person who is not LGBT but who actively supports LGBT communities) or both. Use of LGBT or LGBTQ is best as an adjective and an umbrella term. Don't use it, for instance, when the group you're referring to is limited to bisexuals. Walters joined the LGBTQ business association. Queer is an umbrella term covering people who are not heterosexual or cisgender and is acceptable for people and organizations that use the term to identify themselves. Do not use it when intended as a slur. Follow guidelines fo
David Swanson
01:04:55
I’ve also seen LGBTQ+
Irvina LEW
01:05:02
can "gay" be used as an umbrella?
David Swanson
01:05:27
Good question. It used to be, but I think LGBT is poreferred
Kim Harms Robinson
01:05:37
Wondering how museums/attractions should address sensory, physical and other 'challenges' in creating a link that they can go in an effort to see what is offered specifically for them? Accessible seems appropriate but can sometimes be too general.
Harrison Liu
01:07:15
What about people of Mongoloid decent?
Kay Maghan
01:08:10
What was the name of the other resource Kasey mentioned for guidelines?
Jill Robinson
01:09:03
@Kay, https://ncdj.org/
David Swanson
01:09:13
"Accessible” can also have nothing to do with physical limitations
Meryl Pearlstein
01:09:23
Will someone compile a list of the currently preferred/acceptable list of terms? This discussion is so helpful but there are clearly differing opinions and usage.
Kasey Kaler
01:09:32
https://ncdj.org/style-guide/
Kay Maghan
01:09:47
Thanks Jill and Kasey
LEBAWIT GIRMA
01:10:39
Thank you, Cory. :)
LEBAWIT GIRMA
01:10:54
And Marty!
LEBAWIT GIRMA
01:11:56
It reminds us of the history and the reality of that time.
connie nelson
01:12:08
Thank you Cory and Marti!
Brian Major
01:13:14
"Enslaved Africans" is people-first and preferable to me. I agree with Marti.
Megan Padilla
01:13:36
If we stop using BIPOC, what term do we use to refer broadly to non-white people?
Chez Chesak
01:13:54
‘People’. :-)
David Swanson
01:14:15
I use non-gay!
LEBAWIT GIRMA
01:14:17
Why not just mention their specific heritage?
Meryl Pearlstein
01:14:27
Do people ever use Caucasian?
LEBAWIT GIRMA
01:14:30
As opposed to color
Vickie Ashford-Thompson
01:14:49
Such an awesome panel! Learned so much today. Thank you so much on behalf of the DEI committee.
David Swanson
01:15:14
As a lover of words, I LOVE this session!
Joan Tapper
01:15:29
This has been an outstanding session.
Chez Chesak
01:15:29
Yeah, this is brilliant. And what an amazing collection of voices and perspectives. Many thanks to the DEI Cmte and others that helped bring this together.
Megan Padilla
01:15:29
The word “minority” — can we discuss to stamp it out?
Jantine Van Kregten
01:15:33
Really appreciated everyone's time and expertise today. Thank you!
sarah greaves-gabbadon
01:15:36
SUCH an illuminating session. Thanks
Harrison Liu
01:15:37
What about asian people?
Becky Lomax
01:15:42
Excellent panel discussion today. Thank you so much everyone for putting this together and sharing thoughts. So helpful
Victoria Larson
01:15:50
Great Session! Really helpful and thoughtful!
Jill Robinson
01:15:59
Thank you all so much for your work and helping us examine our own language.
Shelly Rivoli
01:16:13
Can anyone address non-binary language, beyond they/their/them? I was recently told I can call my brother's child (who is an adult, not a child) my "nibling," for example. Is there a source for more terms like this?
LEBAWIT GIRMA
01:16:16
Good question, Harri! :)
Chez Chesak
01:16:17
I think each speaker could do a single presentation individually, almost - or this could be another hour (or two) longer…
sarah greaves-gabbadon
01:16:17
@Megan: Yes! I detest the term minority! There’s nothing “minor” about me - or anyone else!
Joan Tapper
01:16:20
I thought the issue was Brazil, where they speak Portuguese
Maribeth Mellin
01:16:21
Good question, Harry
connie nelson
01:16:31
Very helpful session. Thanks for providing the opportunity to learn.
Barbara Golden
01:16:33
Country or culture on Hispanic?
Amy Eckert
01:16:33
What a great session. Thank you so much for helping us all be more thoughtful and sensitive with our words
Patricia Winn
01:16:34
Thank you; this has been an excellent session.
Meryl Pearlstein
01:16:41
Thank you everyone. Fabulous session and great group of experts.
Ellen Albanese
01:16:47
Thank you.
LEBAWIT GIRMA
01:16:51
Great session, thank you all so much
Larry Bleiberg
01:16:54
What a great panel! A huge thanks to everyone who made this happen.
LEBAWIT GIRMA
01:17:12
Hear hear, Sarah!
Jo Duncan
01:17:16
Great job everyone! Thanks, Tonya!
Irvina LEW
01:17:35
Thanks for this...
Kim MacKinnon
01:17:41
Thanks for this!
Marika Cain
01:17:44
Thanks so much, all - this is a great session.
Harrison Liu
01:17:50
Thank you Marty for even mentioning Asian people
Kim Harms Robinson
01:18:07
That's another great question - how do you say Asian - should you say Chinese, Japanese, Taiwanese?
Brian Major
01:19:16
Thank you all for this terrific panel session!
Shelly Rivoli
01:20:07
Thanks for this excellent panel!
Carolyn Heller
01:20:24
Thank you. So much useful information.
Paula Froke
01:20:44
pfroke@ap.org … get in touch if you have thoughts, suggestions, etc.
LEBAWIT GIRMA
01:20:44
Thank you Megan & Vickie for organizing this!
Annita Thomas
01:21:01
Thank You - great session!
Kim Harms Robinson
01:21:01
Excellent panel and discussion. LOVED our panelists honesty and to the point! I also appreciated that people could ask questions without fear
MAUREEN LITTLEJOHN
01:21:18
Excellent panel. Lots of information packed nto one hour!
Laura Del Rosso
01:21:21
This was excellent. Learned a lot. Thank you all.
roberta garzaroli
01:21:31
Thanks for this great discussion, agree we could go on for hours
Stephanie Selk
01:21:32
Really appreciate the panel and everyone's time and expertise!
Maribeth Mellin
01:21:35
Excellent!
Rich Grant
01:21:40
Fantastic! Thanks!!!
Ian Fitzpatrick
01:21:46
Thanks to everyone. Very illuminating.
Barbara Golden
01:22:41
thank you!